Aboard

Adverb

  • (nautical) Alongside. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]

    "The ships came close aboard to pass messages."

  • On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]

    "We all climbed aboard."

  • Into a team, group, or company. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]

    "The office manager welcomed him aboard."

  • (baseball) On base. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]

    "He doubled with two men aboard, scoring them both."

  • (nautical) Alongside. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]

    "The captain laid his ship aboard the enemy's ship."

  • On or onto a horse, a camel, etc. [First attested in the late 19th century.]

    "To sling a saddle aboard."

Preposition

  • Onto a horse. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
  • On board of; onto or into a ship, boat, train, plane. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]

    "We all went aboard the ship."

  • (obsolete) Across; athwart; alongside. [Attested from the early 16th century until the late 17th century.]

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