Account

Noun

  • A statement explaining one's conduct.
  • An authorization to use a service.

    "I've opened an account with Wikipedia so that I can contribute and partake in the project."

  • (banking) A sum of money deposited at a bank and subject to withdrawal.

    "to keep one's account at the bank."

  • A reason, grounds, consideration, motive.

    "on every account"

  • A record of events; recital of transactions; a relation or narrative; a report; a description.

    "An account of a battle."

  • Importance; worth; value; esteem; judgement.
  • Profit; advantage.
  • (accounting) A registry of pecuniary transactions; a written or printed statement of business dealings or debts and credits, and also of other things subjected to a reckoning or review
  • A reason, grounds, consideration, motive.

    "on no account"

  • (business) A business relationship involving the exchange of money and credit.
  • An estimate or estimation; valuation; judgment.
  • (archaic) A reckoning; computation; calculation; enumeration; a record of some reckoning.
  • A statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, etc., explanatory of some event; a reason of an action to be done.

    "No satisfactory account has been given of these phenomena."

  • A reason, grounds, consideration, motive.

    "on all accounts"

Verb

  • to count
  • (obsolete) To recount, relate (a narrative etc.). [14th-16th c.]
  • to provide explanation
  • (transitive) To estimate, consider (something to be as described). [from 14th c.]
  • (intransitive) To give a satisfactory evaluation for (one's actions, behaviour etc.); to answer for. [from 16th c.]

    "We must account for the use of our opportunities."

  • (intransitive) To cause the death, capture, or destruction of someone or something (+ for). [from 19th c.]
  • (obsolete) To count (up), enumerate. [14th-17th c.]
  • (intransitive, now rare) To give an account of financial transactions, money received etc. [from 14th c.]
  • (intransitive) To give a satisfactory evaluation for financial transactions, money received etc. [from 15th c.]

    "An officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received."

  • (intransitive) To establish the location for someone. [from 19th c.]

    "After the crash, not all passengers were accounted for."

  • (transitive, now rare) To calculate, work out (especially with periods of time). [from 14th c.]
  • (obsolete, transitive) To present an account of; to answer for, to justify. [14th-17th c.]
  • (intransitive) To consider that. [from 14th c.]
  • (intransitive) To give a satisfactory reason for; to explain. [from 16th c.]

    "Idleness accounts for poverty."

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