Lash

Adjective

  • Soft, watery, wet.
  • Drunk.
  • (obsolete) Relaxed.
  • (Ulster) excellent, wonderful

    "That Chinese (food) was lash!"

  • (obsolete) Remiss, lax.
  • (Ulster) excellent, wonderful

    "We’re off school tomorrow, it’s gonna be lash!"

Noun

  • The thong or braided cord of a whip, with which the blow is given.
  • A stroke of satire or sarcasm; an expression or retort that cuts or gives pain; a cut.
  • In British English, it refers to heavy drinking with friends, (i.e. We were out on the lash last night)
  • A stroke with a whip, or anything pliant and tough.

    "The culprit received thirty-nine lashes."

  • In carpet weaving, a group of strings for lifting simultaneously certain yarns, to form the figure.
  • (obsolete) A leash in which an animal is caught or held; hence, a snare.
  • A hair growing from the edge of the eyelid; an eyelash.

Verb

  • (transitive) To bind with a rope, cord, thong, or chain, so as to fasten.

    "lash a pack on a horse's back"

  • (transitive) To strike forcibly and quickly, as with a lash; to beat, or beat upon, with a motion like that of a lash.

    "And big waves lash the frighted shores. — John Dryden"

  • (intransitive) To ply the whip; to strike.
  • (transitive) To bind with a rope, cord, thong, or chain, so as to fasten.

    "to lash something to a spar"

  • (transitive) To strike forcibly and quickly, as with a lash; to beat, or beat upon, with a motion like that of a lash.

    "the whale lashes the sea with its tail."

  • (transitive) To scold; to berate; to satirize; to censure with severity.

    "to lash vice"

  • (intransitive, of rain) To fall heavily, especially in the phrase lash down
  • (transitive) To strike with a lash; to whip or scourge with a lash, or with something like one.

    "We lash the pupil, and defraud the ward. — John Dryden"

  • (transitive) To throw out with a jerk or quickly.

    "He falls, and lashing up his heels, his rider throws. — John Dryden"

  • (intransitive) To utter censure or sarcastic language.

    "To laugh at follies, or to lash at vice. — John Dryden"

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.